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1  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Macerator pump leak and door strut failure on: August 27, 2015, 11:38:39 am
An analogy of the vacuum on the drain hose is like what happens to liquid in a straw when you put your finger over one end and the liquid no longer flows out of the other end.  You break the vacuum by letting some air into the system.
2  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: MPG - E450 - four summers on: August 27, 2015, 11:27:04 am
The Tow/Haul mode is activated by pressing the button on the end of the gearshift lever.
We always tow our Honda CR-V, but only use this mode for engine breaking on downhills or to come to a slowdown or stop quickly.
The Ford owner's manual contains a section under Transmission.
  --Bruce
3  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: MPG - E450 - four summers on: August 27, 2015, 01:39:01 am
I'm not certain that the following is appropriate to a post on MPG, but since we've touched on downshifting, etc. here is another thought to share:

I totally agree with Barry on manually increasing the throttle a little to maintain the speed set point in cruise control as long as the RPM's don't drop too much.  I also hate to see the RMP's jump up too much.  I'd rather slow down some than try to stay at some previously desired speed.

On declines I rely heavily on the Tow/Haul mode to slow us down.  A brief tap on the brake pedal releases the cruise control and a push on the Tow/Haul button before more brake is applied will usually be all we need to maintain a safe speed.  I seldom need to select a lower gear myself.  Of course on really steep declines more braking will be needed, but the automatic downshifting after a brief braking is all that is normally needed in our experience to get to an appropriate gear.  I'd rather have the engine/transmission work together to keep us safe rather than using the break pedal.

--Bruce
4  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Macerator pump leak and door strut failure on: August 27, 2015, 01:05:27 am
John,
Here's my experience with emptying the hose:
I find the macerator hose a little slow to drain when the pump is off, but I've never had to stow it full of water.  I make sure that there is a small gap between the dump receptacle and the end of the hose so that air can get in to break any vacuum in the hose and then start lifting the hose starting at the storage compartment and walking it up to the dump (shaking the hose a little as I go).  Usually take three or four times doing this before the hose is practically empty.  Then I cap the end of the hose and don't worry about the small amount still in the hose--it's almost clear gray water at that point.
That's what I do.  Hope this helps.
--Bruce
5  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: MPG - E450 - four summers on: August 25, 2015, 07:48:28 pm
When we're on a freeway in cruise control, I'll often let the transmission shift down once if it looks like the incline we're on is fairly short and know it will shift up soon.  If the incline in long or the transmission shifts down again due to the steepness of the grade, I always turn the cruise control off and choose the gear myself.  We do slow down some, but I hate to hear the engine race and waste fuel.
--Bruce
6  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Unstable 30AMP Service on: August 25, 2015, 01:26:20 am
The September 2015 issue of MotorHome magazine has an article on page 99 entitled Power Trip 101 that covers some of the topics included in this thread.

It is primarily focused on 50 amp hookup pedestals, but includes graphics that help me to better understand Barrys original post here.  It describes the Leg 1 and 2 that I think Barry calls Phase 1 and 2.

We always use a portable Surge Guard, but seldom use our voltmeter or anything else to check the pedestal.  This discussion is making me reevaluate our technique.

--Bruce
7  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Unstable 30AMP Service on: August 22, 2015, 12:49:28 pm
Barry,
Thank you for posting your experience on the pedestal power problem.

Before this summer I didnt know that a 50 to 30 amp converter was possible.  On our first trip this summer we had just hooked up in a busy RV park with many ac units running when the pedestal 30 amp circuit breaker at our site opened several times within 30 minutes.  The park repairman came by and said that the circuit breaker was probably defective, but he didnt have the time or parts immediately available.  He loaned us his 50 to 30 amp converter (I think it was a standard unit) and we had no more failures during our two-day stay.

After that experience we bought and now bring a converter with us in case this happens again where no help is easily available.  

I think Ive learned from your post that the success of the converter depends on the configuration of the wires in both the pedestal and the converter.  So it seems that if this situation does happen again, well have at best a 50-50 chance that it will work (probably less chance since most parks will be wired like the one in your situation).

The 50 to 30 amp converter would have the same chance to help in a case where the 30 amp circuit in the park was weak for any reason (too many users, etc.) but the 50 amp circuit was good.

Do you think Ive got this right?

--Bruce
8  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: NORCOLD Door Hinge Retrofit Kit on: August 18, 2015, 03:05:46 pm
Ron and Barry,

Your directions really helped me remove the door.  When it was off and placed down on the bed, I could see and feel that the door already has the metal hinge in place.

Before taking the door off I felt totally confident that the hinge was made of plastic, but all that I could really see was the very edge of the hinge.

Anyway, this discovery made the job very easy.  Just reinstall the door and be done with it.   LOL

Thanks again for your help.

--Bruce
9  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: NORCOLD Door Hinge Retrofit Kit on: August 17, 2015, 07:40:57 pm
Ron and Barry,

Thank you both very much for your replies on this.  I think with your help I'll be able to get the kit installed tomorrow.

Will let you know how it goes.

--Bruce
10  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: NORCOLD Door Hinge Retrofit Kit on: August 17, 2015, 04:49:35 pm
Barry,
I just received a Norcold Door Hinge Kit and find the installation instruction page to be of almost no help.

I assume I first take the door off by removing the top and bottom plastic screws at the hinges.

Is the next step to slide the Retrofit-hinge-left someplace at the bottom of the refrigerator or at the bottom of the door?

I'd like to better understand this before starting on this.

Since you are very good at posting procedures, can you list the steps for me?

--Bruce
11  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Miles per year on your Phoenix? on: August 12, 2015, 11:59:36 am
We purchased our new PC two years ago and now have a little over 10,000 miles on it (including the delivery miles from the factory to California).  We drove our diesel pusher about that much each year during the ten years we owned it.  Now in our mid-70's, we're happy to drive less and stay longer at each stop.  We like the variety of locations within easy reach of our home, including beach towns, mountain towns, and desert cities in California and Oregon.
--Bruce and Sharon 
12  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Squeaking faucet handle on bathroom sink on: July 31, 2015, 05:55:00 pm
Barry,
You've posted an excellent explanation of the process.  That and both of our photos might be helpful to others.
Thanks for helping out here.
--Bruce
13  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Squeaking faucet handle on bathroom sink on: July 31, 2015, 12:10:41 pm
I finally learned how to remove the squeaky valve inside our bathroom faucet handle.  It turned out to be very easy, but I couldnt see how until I removed  the entire faucet from the counter.

The valve had been right before my eyes after just removing the handle and the plastic nut beneath the handle (the steps listed in my previous posts).

The valve is on the top end of the white threaded handle stem that you can see in the photo below.  That little valve is just pushed into placeno threads on it and no pliers or wrench needed to pull it out. 

The place on the valve that meets with the stem looks like the last tread there.  I slipped a thin bladed screwdriver into that spot and separated the valve from the stem and applied some lubricant (just as shown in the video that Barry posted).

No more squeak now.

--Bruce
14  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Squeaking faucet handle on bathroom sink on: July 30, 2015, 01:40:22 am
Janey,
Thanks for the tip on a Home Depot replacement.  I'll do that after I break our current one.   LOL

Barry,
Thanks for the you tube link.  The faucet design does look similar ours (the cap on ours is about 1/3 the size and fits flush with the top of the handle).  It sure looks scary the way he uses the adjustable wrench to pull the stem out without breaking it or striping the threads.  I don't understand what he is doing with the stem in the table vice--none of the other videos I've watched includes anything like that.

I'll make another attempt soon.

--Bruce
15  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Squeaking faucet handle on bathroom sink on: July 29, 2015, 08:05:38 pm
Barry,
On our faucets there is a small, somewhat oval, about 3/4" long piece on the handle showing hot or cold side.  I gentle slipped a thin pointed knife blade under the edge of that "cap" and popped it out.
I hope you can tell me how to continue on ours.
--Bruce
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