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136  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Report on alignment and handling of our 2552 on: September 24, 2013, 03:08:49 pm
It's good to hear that options are available to help all RVers have a safe and pleasant time driving their rigs.  I'm sharing our experience with hope that someone might benefit from it.

The minor handling issue that we had with our 2552 was not so much the feeling of being blown aside by a passing truck, but most often just the feeling of the coach drifting to one side or the other while traveling on the highway requiring more steering adjustments than I would normally expect in another vehicle.  I could live with those adjustments, but wanted to minimize them if we could and also enhance safety while driving a large vehicle.

I could see that the Safe-T-Plus definitely helps to keep the coach moving forward on a straight line as well as providing protection from the wheels being pulled off of the road due to a blow-out, etc.  Our Henderson installer took along some tools on a test drive with us after the Safe-T-Plus was put on, and we could see that the coach had a tendency to move too much to the right on its own as we traveled down a road with only a small amount of center crown.  We stopped in a turn-out along the road while the installer crawled under the coach to make a minor adjustment which resulted in the coach now moving almost perfectly straight.  He didn't want to make any further adjustment as that might give the coach a tendency to move left (which could cause a problem at some point).

After many more miles of highway driving, I feel that the remaining required steering adjustments are the normal type that are needed in any vehicle on the road.


137  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Report on alignment and handling of our 2552 on: September 23, 2013, 12:38:10 pm
Sparky,
I don't think that the actual length of a coach makes a great difference in the tendency to road wander.  But the ratio of wheel base to coach length could make a difference.  For example, if a coach with a certain wheel base were to be made longer without changing the wheel base (making the ratio of wheel base to length smaller), the extra length and weight would extend behind the rear axle.  This would likely cause the "tail to wag the dog" and make steering more difficult.  Just a thought.
Bruce
138  Main Forum / General Discussion / Report on alignment and handling of our 2552 on: September 23, 2013, 02:09:18 am
After traveling in our 2014 Model 2552 for several weeks, we want to report how happy we are with our decision to buy it.  Living in it is a pleasure and driving it is fairly easy.  The ride is comfortable enough and not at all the “truck-like” feeling that we anticipated.

We did experience some “wandering” of the coach while driving on the freeway that was bothersome in keeping the vehicle going in a straight line due to the many minor steering wheel adjustments required.  This was something we could live with, but hoped could be improved.

We wanted an expert opinion on the handling and wheel alignment to see if even minor improvements could be made.  So, we had Henderson’s Line-up in Grants Pass, Oregon do their Road Performance Assessment with us.  They describe this as “a systematic, diagnostic 15-mile road test that reveals steering and suspension problems over a variety of road surfaces.”

The report we received (both verbal and written) was very encouraging.  They feel that no improvement was needed in suspension, braking, or weight distribution.  They did suggest that we install a Safe-T-Plus unit and check the alignment of all wheels.

The reason for the Safe-T-Plus is to improve the tracking under normal circumstances and to provide safety in situations such as a blowout, a sudden gust of wind from a passing truck, or a pothole in the road.  It is a steering control device that will automatically stabilize the vehicle.

We followed both of the recommendations.  Only minor adjustments were needed in the front wheel alignment and none for the rear wheels.  The Safe-T-Plus definitely eliminated most of the wandering and gives us more confidence while driving.

The peace of mind we enjoy now justifies the cost involved. We highly recommend the personnel at Henderson’s who were all extremely knowledgeable, helpful and accommodating.  They even allowed us to plug in and stay overnight at their facility.

Bruce and Sharon
139  Main Forum / General Discussion / Questions about HWH jack operation on: September 23, 2013, 12:06:16 am
I posted these questions before in "Tips and Tricks" and got a couple of replies.  Sparky suggested I post them in this section to get more replies.

My questions are:

1.  How should I interpret the HWH Operator's Manual statement that says "REMEMBER, if lifted too high, the vehicle may roll forward or backward off the jacks."  My question is how high is too high?  We're still trying to understand how to use the jacks.

I understand that some weight must be left on the rear wheels because the parking brake is applied to those and help prevent the vehicle from rolling.  How do you determine how much weight should be left on the rear?  And is there a certain height limit for the front wheels?

2.  Do the HWH jacks automatically stop extending when a maximum is reached?

I've never held the extend button long enough on any jack to see if it would stop on its own.

Bruce

140  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: How much lift is "too high" with HWH jacks? on: September 22, 2013, 11:37:01 pm
Sparky,
Like you, most of our stays are in RV parks with fairly level sites.  This week we are staying at Premier RV Resort in Redding, Ca and our site is almost perfectly level.  We still put down the jacks just to stabilize the coach especially when using the patio door.  Only takes a few minutes to put them down and it's good to give them regular exercise.
Bruce
141  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: How much lift is "too high" with HWH jacks? on: September 22, 2013, 01:14:07 am
Sparky,

I'm happy to hear that you have interest in this topic.

I use the jacks as described in the hwh owners manual, which I would describe as manual.  We first extend all four jacks (unfold them), then extend the jacks on the low wheels until the coach is level.  Once we are level, extend the remaining jacks until they touch the ground.

As I mentioned in the original post, sometime the coach is too far off level to start with and we run out of safe (too much) jack extension before we reach level.  How much is "too much" was my original question.

When I want more lift than I feel is safe with the jacks, I've been driving up on some leveling blocks before extending the hwh jacks.  We need to put additional blocks on the ground under the jacks before starting to extend them. 

I'm not aware of any automatic procedure with these jacks and had never thought about taking some weight off of the tires by extending the jacks while the coach is in storage.  Maybe someone else has some opinions on this.

Bruce

142  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: How much lift is "too high" with HWH jacks? on: September 14, 2013, 05:14:16 pm
Dick,
Thank you for sharing your experience with the jacks--nice to hear info from HWH.  I'll now feel more secure in raising the front end.
Another question:
Do you use leveling bubbles to estimate how much you'll need to lift?  If so, where do you mount them?
Best regards,
Bruce
143  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / How much lift is "too high" with HWH jacks? on: September 13, 2013, 06:47:24 pm
My question is how to interpret the HWH Operator's Manual statement that says "REMEMBER, if lifted too high, the vehicle may roll forward or backward off the jacks."  How do I determine what is "too high"?  And, do the HWH jacks automatically stop extending when a maximum is reached?

Here is our situation:
For the second time this month we're in a campsite that slopes away quite a bit on the front right side of our coach.  This site is all on dirt, near to a stream running in front of us.  Other than the slope, we like this site and don't want to move to another for the week that we'll be here.  So, we've managed to minimize the slope by moving the coach around a few feet, driving the right front tire up on 3 1/2" of blocks, placing 3 1/2" of pads under the HWH jack at that corner, and extending the HWH jack as much as I'm sure is safe.  The entry steps are a bit high off of the ground, so we've put a small portable step on the ground to help us climb up.  We're almost level now, but still have a little slope to the front right.

I'm tempted to extend the jacks a bit more, but don't want to push my luck before seeking help.  Any suggestions will be appreciated.

--Bruce
144  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: How did you take delivery? on: September 13, 2013, 01:02:15 am
Kermit's son, Kraig delivered our 2552 to us near Gilroy, CA.  We understand that he regularly delivers coaches to folks all over the country for a reasonable fee.
--Bruce and Sharon
145  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Do you use pads with your auto-leveler? on: September 10, 2013, 01:18:04 am
We experienced another situation today that put our jack pads to work.  We're now in Southern Oregon where the temperature is expected to reach about 100 degrees each day this week.  Because of this heat, the RV park owner where we're staying is requiring all RV's using metal leveling jacks to use jack pads in order to protect the asphalt sites.  We're happy that we have the required pads with us. 
146  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Do you use pads with your auto-leveler? on: September 09, 2013, 01:51:06 am
After our last experience, I would say 8 or 10 of the 12" pads would be useful at times.  Some to roll a wheel(s) on to and some to place under the jacks.  Might only need that many in an unlevel site.
Bruce
147  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Do you use pads with your auto-leveler? on: September 08, 2013, 09:44:32 pm
I don't know if this is a good example to follow, but the four 12" x 12" pads that we carry helped us to get the coach level during our recent stay in a very side sloping site.  We could back in far enough to get the rear end level side to side, but the front right wheel was very low.  We first extended our leveling jacks to about the maximum that I felt safe to do.  We were still on a downward slope to the right side, enough to feel uncomfortable inside.  That's when an idea came to me:
There was a 5 ft. length of 4" x 6" lumber and another shorter length of 2" x 6" near the rear of the site.  I guessed that someone had used these before.
I used three of the 12" pads to build a step up to the 4 x 6 we had laid lengthwise in front of the right tire, and then continued forward on to the 2 x 6.
Then we used a stack of the pads to insert under the jacks before starting to extend them. This time we could extend the jacks enough to level the coach.

It looked strange and maybe unsafe with the right front tire balanced on the 6" wide lumber, but we camped there for 9 days with no problem.

Maybe someone can tell me if this was safe?

Thanks,
Bruce
148  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Sound under bed in 2552 on: September 06, 2013, 12:03:38 pm
Bob,
Thank you so much for the great explanation of our inverter system.
The fan does not actually bother me at night, except that I worried that something was going bad.  We are in an older RV park currently with some unusual electric plugin units and I thought it could be causing our system to act up.
Now I can rest easy.
Bruce
149  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Sound under bed in 2552 on: September 05, 2013, 06:46:08 pm
Thanks!
I never would have thought of the Inverter, especially since it is off where we are now camped.  It's very quiet here, so the fan is more noticeable.
Bruce
150  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Problems accessing forum? on: September 05, 2013, 06:39:53 pm
Ron, Is CCleaner appropriate for Apple products like Mac Book and I-Pad or just PC's?
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