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16  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Alignment experience on: August 21, 2012, 09:44:53 am
I bought my PC 2551 with 4K miles on it and have no idea whether it had been aligned or not.  However, it is very comfortable to drive in everything but a strong (30mph+) crosswind and shows no signs of tire wear.  Now, does anybody have a real good idea of how much difference it makes if I do have it aligned that I load up as precisely as has been suggested?  These are heavy vehicles with very strong suspension systems and I wonder how much effect a couple of hundred pounds here or there makes.  When I have my car tires aligned, I do not put 150 pound sandbags in all four seats and in the trunk, nor make sure the gas tank is filled.  If it is required for trucks, why not for cars?  Just wondering??

Jerry
17  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: 2350 or ? What did you choose and why? on: August 20, 2012, 04:50:38 pm
Tom is sort of right on my being out of touch on pricing of vent covers.  My wallet is out of touch with opening up to buy the slightly higher rate of flow premium covers from Camping World or PPL.  If you look at the WalMart (I do live in Arkansas) website, you will find Camco covers for standard 14" square vents for $19.  You will find them to have very high ratings from the people who purchased them.  Someone who asked if they would work with the powered vents got 3 responses, all positive from people who use them.  RV's are a lot like boats, cars, or any other hobby, you can go for top of the line bells and whistles or just buy whatever works at a good price.  Kind of like since the invention of quartz crystal watches, a Timex keeps just as accurate time as a Rolex.  Sure it doesn't last as long, but how many can you buy for the same price.

Jerry
18  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: 2350 or ? What did you choose and why? on: August 20, 2012, 10:35:29 am
I would second Tom's suggestion that you get covers on your vents/fan outlets on the roof.  First, you can then drive with the vents open and not worry about the wind buffeting them or rain coming in and if something goes wrong with the mechanism as it did on yours, it will not go flying up because of the bernoulli force of the wind going over it.  These covers only cost about $30 or so and are well worth having.  First thing I always have installed when I get a new motorhome.

Jerry
19  Main Forum / Adventure Anywhere / Re: gettysburg pa on: August 19, 2012, 10:47:38 am
If you do decide to go through Pennsylvania Dutch Country, you might want to consider seeing the Strasburg Railroad and Museum.  They have tons of vintage steam trains, one of which was used in "Hello Dolly" for the rail trip down from Yonkers.  They run round trips to Paradise and back.  I've taken this and it's a lot of fun.

Jerry
20  Main Forum / Adventure Anywhere / Re: gettysburg pa on: August 19, 2012, 09:31:14 am
I don't have a map in front of me to reference the campgrounds you mentioned, but two of my favorite civil war sites are just south of Gettysburg and kinda on the way to DC.  The first is the Antietam battleground.  It is the opposite of Gettysburg.  There are few marble monuments and the battleground has been preserved much as it looked in the civil war days. It's very moving to get out and stroll through the fields and envision what happened there.  The other place is Harper's Ferry, WV, just down the road south from Antietam.  The town has been preserved so you can see what it looked like when John Brown attacked it.  There is also an overlook over the confluence of two rivers that Thomas Jefferson described as the most beautiful sight in America.  I've been there many times and don't get tired of seeing it.  Hope you have a good trip.

Jerry
21  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Gasoline smell in cabin on: August 10, 2012, 10:49:56 pm
Fifty years ago everyone on this forum would have suggested the answer you reached.  Those were the days when cars had carbs that had to be adjusted for high altitude use.  Since fuel injection and electronic monitoring, we forget that the generators still use carbs.  Good detection.

Jerry
22  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Electric tow hitch on: August 08, 2012, 11:37:24 am
Since I own a perfectly good tow setup I'm not in the market, but reading the FAQ's on the website reminded me of another physics concept - mechanical advantage using a lever arm.  The "stinger" on the tow setup functions as a lever and allows the weight on the RV rear end to be considerably less than half the weight of the vehicle.  They quoted 450 pounds (still high) for the Toyota Rave shown in their picture and mentioned that longer stinger lengths were available for heavier vehicles.  These things might, and I stress the term MIGHT, be worth trying if the cost about 1/3 what they do.  Anyway, it was worth looking at the website just to see yet another way to sking a cat.

Jerry
23  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Errors in speedometer and trip meter on: August 07, 2012, 01:23:30 pm
Before you guys need to get calculators with more digits of readout, you need to go read up on terms like accuracy, precision, repeatability, reproducabilty, random error, and significant figures.  I was once in an honors geometry class in high school where a guy with a real photographic memory recited pi to a couple of hundred places.  The teacher wisely gave him a zero for wasting his time.

Jerry
24  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: tow dolly with 2551 on: August 04, 2012, 09:37:14 am
I have towed several different vehiclles 4 down on several motorhomes, all without problems.  However, you may encounter a lot of limitations on max speed, need to stop and run through gears every so many miles, need to pull fuses to keep miles from recording on odometer, etc.  On the other hand, I've heard people complain about where to stash the dolly when you're parked for a few days, dragging it around to hook it up, and, of course, it costs about $1,200 or so to buy.  I'm limited to 65mph in my Chevy HHR and am willing to live with that rather than buy and fool with a dolly.

Jerry
25  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Gray water by-pass? on: August 03, 2012, 10:23:31 am
For those of you who like blacktop roads that are a little off the beaten path, highway 20 from Sedro-Wooley, Washington, to Twisp is highly recommended.  This takes you through the really beautiful Northern Cascades National Park.  The scenery is wonderful and it is NOT crowded.  You will see more campgrounds without hookups than more elaborate ones, but the views of mountains, lakes, and rain forests are well worth it.  If you're coming down from Canada south of Vancouver, go a little further east to cross at a less busy crossing and you can drive due south to get to Sedro-Wooley. 

Jerry
26  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Gray water by-pass? on: August 02, 2012, 09:51:46 pm
Ron, you've obviously never camped in the little forest service campground located in a rain forest just down the road from Rainy Pass in the Cascades NP.  It's like I described above plus water dripping off all the trees.  Once I was in my space, I wasn't going outside after dark.

Jerry
27  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Gray water by-pass? on: August 02, 2012, 05:47:41 pm
I'm with Tom.  Say we're parked in an unlighted, deserted, no hookup campground with really smelly pit toilets and it's 40 degrees outside and I wake up at 2am with a desire to go to the toilet.  Do I get up, get dressed, get a flashlight, and head out into the woods with the wolves and bears?  Or, do I roll gently out of my twin bed right by the rear bathroom and enjoy the comfort of modern plumbing? Even if it means flushing the tanks at the next stop with hookups, I don't have to think twice.

Jerry
28  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Gray water by-pass? on: August 02, 2012, 08:30:45 am
I continue to be dazzled by the degree of thought that goes into using your RV by so many people. I just wait until I need to get rid of black or gray water and flip on my macerator pump in the proper sequence and send it to the drain.  I takes no more than 5 minutes to do this, 10 at the most, and I find it much nicer than dealing with the old 3" gravity flow hoses.  They are MESSY.

By the way, Ron, I always like your descriptions of waste management in your unit.  Other than some sort of innate distaste of bodily excretions, why would you worry about urine contamination of your shower.  Ever swim in a public pool?  Think those little kids hesitate about urinating in them?  Also, urine is essentially sterile until it picks up a few germs on the way out of the body.  Believe it or not, millions of strange people world wide drink their own urine thinking it will keep them healthy.  I'd worry more about some of the smelly, bad tasting fresh water that is available at many campgrounds as potable water.

Jerry
29  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Manual on: July 30, 2012, 05:23:23 pm
Ditto on the bag with a stapled together xeroxed manual and a ton of brochures on the equipment in the unit.  When I bought a really nice Leisure Travel van conversion a few years ago, which I might still have if my wife didn't object to rigging up the shower in the middle of the aisle in the kitchen, the unit came with a video cassette from the manufacturer walking you through the unit and demonstrating how to find and operate everything in it  PC might consider putting out a DVD for their units. I bet that Aimee would be a really knowledgeable creator of such a disk???

Jerry
30  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Disinfecting and draining potable water tank on: July 30, 2012, 05:17:14 pm
Having had the outside valve replaced last year on my lightly used 2006 PC 2551, I would suggest that it was moved inside to get it out of the sun.  My valve knob sort of broke into many small dried out pieces, just like the identical appearing ones on igloo ice chests.  BTW, nobody I talked to knew of anybody making metal valves that could be used as an easy replacement.

Jerry
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