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1441  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / So Your Ford Died And Won't Start. First Try This. on: October 17, 2012, 10:15:54 pm
While checking to see if I have a keyless entry module installed on my 2007 E350 chassis, I stumbled on my Fuel Pump Reset Switch.

All you Ford based PC owners should know about this switch.  If your engine suddenly dies, turns over during restart, but simply won't start, the first thing to try is pressing that switch to reset the fuel pump circuit.  Spend a little time to locate it now so you know where it is when needed.

I assume the location is consistent between E-Series model years.  Open the passenger door.  Stand outside and put your head in the footwell.  With a flashlight, read the indented writing located near the top of the right side wall panel.  It indicates where the switch is.  You reach over the top of the panel and blindly feel for the switch which has a rubber plunger feel to it.  With the engine off, press the switch down to the street to get a feel about it.

The purpose of this safety feature is to kill the fuel pump in the event of an accident that ruptures the fuel system.  This prevents fuel from being pumped all over an accident scene.  On rare instance under normal use, a very hard bump on the road can trip this safety feature leaving you stranded.  If your engine dies for no reason, or turns over but won't start, first push the button and see if all is well again.

Our old Ford Taurus would give my wife trouble with this safety feature.  About once every-other year she would call me that her car wouldn't start.  I had to remind her each time to push that reset button.  It gave her trouble only when shopping.  I wonder if people would back into her parked Taurus, tripping the safety feature.  Maybe it was too sensitive.

I think such a switch is on every Ford product.  Any Ford you own, check to see where that switch is located for future reference.  It may be covered in the owners manual.

Blessings All!
1442  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Bolts in the Floor on: October 17, 2012, 12:34:47 pm
George, I am not very familiar with your specific coach, but you describe the area above the generator.  Those bolts might be anchoring the generator mounting brackets.  If this is true, one consideration would be to install wood flooring.  The top of the raised floor might be higher than the bolts, or flush where a decorative plug would do the trick.  If it is a close call, I would tighten the bolts and then grind them down 10 to 20% to tweek them to a height that works.  But DO NOT over-grind.  I am talking just a little bit could be allowed and still be 100% safe.

Just thoughts here from me, not hard recommendations.  I assume the slideout could be adjusted to the new floor height, but I really have no clue how the factory handles this for their wood floor installations.
1443  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Introduce Yourself! on: October 14, 2012, 12:14:14 am
Looking good there Sisters!
1444  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Removing The Macerator Pump on: October 12, 2012, 07:30:44 pm
Gooooooood News.  Kevin In Stealth Mode was right on.  Buried beneath the plastic are 2 disconnects.
Good to know when the day comes to remove mine for whatever the reason.
1445  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Removing The Macerator Pump on: October 12, 2012, 05:23:40 pm
Personally, I would opt for a sealed connector with water-tight gaskets like the auto industry uses.  Wiring to the pigtails, I would solder and shrink-tube over the solder joint for a water tight splice.

I think you can buy the connector pair with pigtail wires at any auto parts store.  Just be sure to select a very heavy guage version to accomodate the amperage of the macerator pump....whatever that is.
1446  Main Forum / Polls / Re: Tow Another Vehicle (Toad)? on: October 12, 2012, 09:19:12 am
Ron, is this what you wanted?
Yes Barry...Thank You!  How did you set this up?
1447  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Conserving Battery Reserves Without Shore Power on: October 12, 2012, 08:35:46 am
When you hook up your 40 amp charger while running the generator, do you disconnect the house batteries first to prevent back feeding into the converter? My understanding is that on the newer converters, back feeding can cause them to over heat and possibly cause a fire. You would then have a pile of ashes where your PC was sitting.
No, I don't do that.

Your concern came up before but my recollection is a bit foggy.  I recall it's okay because the inverter thinks the batteries are charged and then gets out of the charging mode.  The voltage across the batteries while hooked up to the B&D is within proper 12V system standards.  The inverter simply thinks the batteries are fully charged.  The same rules apply as done with a car battery.  A running engine with a battery charger hooked up to it does not damage anything.

Just like with a car, if I didn't have the two batteries to dump the power into, say simply hooking up the charger to the RV without batteries to absorb the energy, then I wonder what bad things could happen.  But given it's a smart charger that reduces the amperage as the batteries recover, there is no excess power in the electrical system.

Keep in mind I have an older Tripp-Lite.  Tom, your concern may be valid with the Xantrex.  Before following my method here, PC owners with a Xantrex should heed your warning and do some research.
1448  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Conserving Battery Reserves Without Shore Power on: October 11, 2012, 08:44:51 pm
I had wondered about those huge solar panels that some here have mounted to their roofs, but given we seek shade tree campsites all the time, they wouldn't be putting out much.
1449  Main Forum / General Discussion / Re: Removing The Macerator Pump on: October 11, 2012, 07:15:32 pm
I can't help you there Bill, but I can relate as I still have not updated my macerator pump mounting strap to the one the factory has been installing the past few years.  Mine made of this stuff is the one embarrassment to my rig.  I still hold my breath when I show people my setup, and it ain't because of any odors.  I could and should come up with something much nicer at home with some materials laying around.
1450  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Conserving Battery Reserves Without Shore Power on: October 11, 2012, 05:21:17 pm
Hi Marilyn,

Both the generator and main Ford V10 engine charge the batteries, and they do so effectively.  The generator (and shore power) charges through the inverter.  The Ford V10 engine charges through the alternator.

The problem we experience arises when our motor home sits for a number of days at a primative campsite without available shore power.  Daily use of 110v appliances (via the inverter) like making coffee and watching movies, drains the batteries quickly.  Of coarse the answer without available shore power is to run the generator or drive the motor home to charge them up.

We do tow a Jeep Liberty and use it for our all-day excursions which means our PC can sit for many days without starting the Ford engine.  So we then rely solely on the generator for battery charging.  Our problem with this is that the generator has to run for many hours to restore the batteries.  Our 2007 Tripp-Lite inverter outputs 20 amps, but our Black & Decker outputs 40 amps which basically cuts the generator run time in half.

In many campgrounds, generator usage is restricted to certian daytime hours.  We often leave our campsite early with the Jeep, and return late giving us little time to charge our house batteries.  The B&D 40 amp charger makes up for that.

If you drive your PC daily, or are plugged into shore power often enough, then I think the 40 amp B&D charger may be of little value.  But with our daily routine, we found the B&D to be the answer to our battery troubles.  Admittedly, we vacation differently than most people.
1451  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Conserving Battery Reserves Without Shore Power on: October 10, 2012, 02:35:42 pm
Recently someone asked me some details about the Black & Decker charger I bought at Walmart.  It appears they no longer offer it.  I did a search on the internet and see that Black & Decker changed the charger styling, but having the same general functionality.  The new design HERE seems to take less storage space than ours.  Sears On-line offers it with free shipping for $106.02 as SEEN HERE.

My charger looks like this one


Here is the new 40/20/10/4 amp style (appears to be more compact)


I also wanted to mention that my B&D charger had something go wrong earlier this year.  It has a high velocity cooling fan, a small version of the type used in computers.  The fan locked up on me for no good reason.  I was able to find a replacement here where I work.  With a little modification to the replacement fan, soldering the two wires, and insulating them with shrink tubing, all is well again.  That fan should not have failed considering the limited use of the charger and how well I kept it.  Hopefully the newer charger design has a better cooling fan inside.
1452  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: The new Xantrex Pro Inverter - how does it work? on: October 08, 2012, 07:39:38 pm
Barry, you are correct.  The microwave is not affected as I had stated.  I edited out those inaccuracies of mine.  I had a senior moment there.
1453  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: The new Xantrex Pro Inverter - how does it work? on: October 08, 2012, 05:36:36 pm
Also keep in mind that the TV's, DVD players etc. always have some current draw while they are plugged in even though you may not be watching them.  That will draw down your batteries while using the inverter as well.  I always keep the TV's and DVD player unplugged until I use them.  Hope that helps some.
Our older Tripp-lite inverter installed in earlier model years, has a documented 12 amp current draw all by itself when sitting idle while generating 110v for any need no matter how small.  Like the TV and DVD player and GFI outlet require some minor amount of 110v.  This keeps the inverter inverting 110v, drawing that 12 amps.  The inverter never gets a chance to go into standby mode which would then draw only 1 amp.

I leave the TV and such plugged in, but kill the inverter using the switch on the inverter itself.  That is the only way to be assured of no battery drain, yet allowing 12v opperations to continue.  Killing the inverter using the kill-all switch by the entry door kills both 110v and 12v which shuts down the fridge which is a very bad thing while on a trip.

I wish the Tripp-Lite control panel was a kill-all switch.  When the control jack is unplugged from the backside of the panel, the best it will do is place the inverter into the 1 amp mode.  That is much better than leaving it to eat 12 amps, but not as dead as flipping the switch on the inverter itself.  Of coarse when the inverter is off-line, the programed TV & radio stations all go bye bye.

CLICK HERE to go to my detailed article on the Tripp-Lite subject matter.  Maybe something will apply to the Xantrex.
1454  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Pads for slide out rollers on: October 08, 2012, 12:10:20 pm
Interesting...
How wide are the rollers?
1455  Main Forum / Tips and Tricks / Re: Pads for slide out rollers on: October 07, 2012, 08:47:48 pm
I wonder if my old style window shade tention reinforcements would be an alternate choice.  They are designed for high-impact, marketed to protect walls from door knobs.  They even have tapered edges for the rollers to ride up.  Maybe they are ideal, and then maybe a flop.  I don't have a slide to test them on.

From My Main "Tips & Tricks/Enhancement" Article
5) Window Shade String Reinforcements
I reinforced the shade tensioners that hold the shade strings at the bottom.  No more issues with those things pulling out of the wall when bumped hard, and bumping them is very easy by the dinette and bed.  The solution looks nice too.  Write-up, pictures & drill template available.  Provide your email address.
Cost Of Project $3 per window
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