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 1 
 on: Today at 12:14:04 am 
Started by Bruce and Sharon - Last post by Bob Mahon
My rear-view monitor is where the rear-view mirror would normally be and I have a stand-alone GPS for direction and destination. I believe a rear-view mirror to be useless and precludes space for meaningful information.

 2 
 on: November 23, 2014, 09:55:36 pm 
Started by Paul/Marilyn - Last post by Paul/Marilyn
What a cutey!! Heart Shower

 3 
 on: November 23, 2014, 05:11:35 pm 
Started by Bruce and Sharon - Last post by 2 Frazzled
Bruce, please add us to the dense list. That's a pretty nice pivot it is mounted on... and so easy to adjust. A helpful to you for saving us a lot of neck twisting. I drive close to the wheel so the monitor was behind my line of sight. Now I can just turn my head. This is just one more thing to remind me to pull out all those manuals and read through them... some day.
Holly

 4 
 on: November 23, 2014, 04:36:24 pm 
Started by Bruce and Sharon - Last post by KB9OMH
Bruce,
     Don't feel bad, it took me a few mile to move the sun visor the the it came and move it to cover the top of the windshield, then I could move the monitor where it would be easy to see while driving.

Jim

 5 
 on: November 23, 2014, 01:38:56 pm 
Started by Bruce and Sharon - Last post by Bruce and Sharon
Is anyone as "dense" as me about the standard position of the rear view monitor in the PC?  I feel foolish posting this, but maybe someone else can benefit from my latest discovery:

I've been less than happy with the need to turn my head so much in order to get a good view of the monitor.  I'm somewhat "height handicapped" and have needed to tilt my head up to even see the monitor while driving.  I've been considering moving the monitor to the rear view mirror position as Ron has suggested in previous posts. 

I just discovered that the monitor doesn't need to stay in the position it was in when the PC was delivered to us.  It finally occurred to me to look behind the monitor and see how easy it is to adjust the position to my liking.  I can now shift my eyes to it about as easy as when looking at the Ford rear view mirror.  This works fine for me and I can keep the Ford mirror with its handy temperature and direction features.

The good part of the story is that it only took about 6,000 miles of driving to discover this.   LOL

--Bruce

 6 
 on: November 22, 2014, 11:13:54 pm 
Started by Paul/Marilyn - Last post by Carol
Nice to hear Pepper and Ginger are still enjoying the joys of the road with you!  I don't know what I'd do without my traveling companion, Dawny.  She loves getting to a new place and discovering all the new smells and critters.  And all the miles and miles of doggy walks we have put onto our six legs has made us both much more fit and healthy than when we set out this past July. 

 7 
 on: November 22, 2014, 01:20:43 pm 
Started by Paul/Marilyn - Last post by Paul/Marilyn
We asked this question way back in February 2012! So glad there have been so many replies. We picked up our 2100 in June that year and have loved every minute having it. Our Chihuahuas, Pepper and Ginger, also love it. We have two small dog beds which stay up between the driver and passenger seat and while on the road they mostly sleep in those, sometimes each to a bed and sometimes together. (They sleep with us at night like they do at home! Grin) Pepper always wants to ride in the passenger's lap and occasionally we give in.

Since picking the 2100 up in 2012 and driving it around Michigan and back home, we've been on several trips around Texas. Last year we spent about a month in New Mexico and Colorado and this last September and October we spent a couple of weeks in New Mexico from Eagle Nest to Cloudcroft. The leaves were beautiful! We finally have a toad, a Chevy Spark, and love that we can leave the dogs in the Cruiser while we go on side trips during the day.

Anyway, our pups are great travelers and like many of you have said as soon as we get the harnesses and leashes out they're ready to go!

 8 
 on: November 21, 2014, 05:15:06 pm 
Started by randallandchris - Last post by David J. Rotelle
I can see why you would think it would make the ride stiffer. I did a lot of research before we installed them on our Born Free primarily on the Born Free leaping lions forum.
I first tried having the leaf springs re arched and that did not improve the ride, I also stopped by MorRyde and had them look at our Born Free and they said their system would have been difficult to install on our coach. So we decided to try the Super Springs after we discovered Born Free started installing them on all their coaches in 2012 to improve their ride.
Born Free's are notorious for riding rough, I know we have owned three.
I would not want to be the one to tell you to put them on your coach but we do like ours.

 9 
 on: November 21, 2014, 10:49:25 am 
Started by randallandchris - Last post by ron.dittmer
Looking at them, I am surprised you say they made your ride smoother.  I would have thought the opposite would be true.

I am considering Sulastic Shackles for the rear axle to soften our ride.  Model SA-06HDD HERE works with all year cut-away Ford E350 & E450 chassis.  But at near $400 to find out if they are effective, it has me a bit gun shy.  I also wonder if they increase, maintain, or decrease the rear end height.  They do seem to offer a logical and simple approach in softening the ride.  I'll have to keep an eye open for a better price, making it worth the risk of disappointing results.

Sulastic Shackle SA-06HDD


I found this picture comparing the Sulastic to the stock shackle for another vehicle.  Sulastic offers a cushy hinge action.
Concerning is the distance between the mounts being less on Sulastic than the stock resulting in a lower rear end.
And there is no weight yet on the Sulastic.

 10 
 on: November 21, 2014, 10:05:31 am 
Started by randallandchris - Last post by David J. Rotelle
Ron,

www.sdtrucksprings.com

If you decide to put them on make sure you jack the frame up plenty high, this allows the rear wheels to hang down enough to get the clearance you need. We used two large C clamps which took a bit of elbow grease, fortunately there is plenty of room to work under there.
Over all it went pretty well with three dairy farmers wrenching on it.  Smile

Dave

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