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 21 
 on: April 20, 2018, 11:59:27 am 
Started by ron.dittmer - Last post by Cropduster
Ron,
You might want to consider the usual travel with your rig.  If you do your share of boondocking which require serious miles on rutted roads. the Konis might be worth the additional expense.  Although, we do mostly off the grid camping, which entails its share of less than quality road surfaces, I have no complainants operating our 2100 with Bilsteins.
You're likely aware that the front driver's side shock replacement is the mechanic's definition of no fun.  I used a ratcheting box-end wrench on the top fastener.  You might be lucky enough to find a plug (generally hidden) which will give you the necessary access.

 22 
 on: April 20, 2018, 11:50:02 am 
Started by RVCamping - Last post by CalCruiser
Ron/Jatrax - I am starting a new discussion in response to another thread that kind of got off topic. During our detailed factory visit in late March with Earl, he verified where most of the non built PC parts come from.
All exterior vacuum bonded side, roof and floor panels are built by a subcontractor in Elkhart and delivered to PC. The same goes for all the fiberglass pieces such as the front faring, side transition panels, storage bin/doors and the lower skirting panels. That subcontractor is using the original molds created and still owned by PC.



The bodywork and interior of the the  Carri-Go model 2310 sold by Carriage then acquired by Dynamax was nearly identical to the Phoenix Cruiser model 2300.  The Carri-Go model 2320 was also nearly identical to the Phoenix Cruiser  non slide-out model 2301.

In 2003 the Phoenix Cruiser model 2350 debuted with the current  dry bathroom design and drivers side slide-out option.

In 2004 Phoenix Cruiser improved the existing 21, 23, and 25 ft model line-up by introducing the molded fiberglass rear cap, hidden running boards, corian countertops, and cut-out cab roof with no tv cabinet.  

Where did the  original design  and tooling come from????



 23 
 on: April 20, 2018, 11:15:41 am 
Started by ron.dittmer - Last post by budlight
Ron, we got the gold Koni shocks installed as part of our suspension upgrade done at Champion Alignment last year.
We were pleased at how they improved the ride over the standard Ford shocks. I would recommend them.
Bud

 24 
 on: April 20, 2018, 10:08:31 am 
Started by jam4travel - Last post by jatrax
Quote
BUT, when ordering full body paint on a custom coach I don't know why you couldn't have purple if you want it???
As I understand it, you can get it painted anything you want.  The Phoenix suggested colors are to give a standard set of matching 'swirls'.  I know there were coaches on the line with mine that had other colors, including one they wanted all white only.

The green color is really nice, I saw one at the Phoenix Cruiser Travel club rally last year.  I'm not 100% sure I would have selected that color but it certainly would have been under consideration. 

One reason for black / gray / white is that they do not age.  Other colors seem to go in and out of fashion thus dating a car or truck or coach.  On the highway I can guess how old a coach is when one goes by with the Winnie orange or that cool blue color.  Not sure it matters as much on a coach but on a car a neutral color has a better resale value.  Or is at least easier to sell.

 25 
 on: April 20, 2018, 10:02:58 am 
Started by ErinS - Last post by jatrax
If the surge protector generates an error you might post that.  Might help determine what it thinks is going on.

 26 
 on: April 20, 2018, 09:44:52 am 
Started by ron.dittmer - Last post by KB9OMH
Ron, got mine at the same place, yes they are the heavy duty one

Jim

 27 
 on: April 20, 2018, 09:43:06 am 
Started by RVCamping - Last post by jatrax
Thank you!

One of the things I was astonished at was the sheer number of sub-contractors, vendors, manufacturers and support companies in Elkhart all dedicated to the RV industry.  I should not have been surprised really, that is how things work when a particular industry is successful in a town.   When I lived in Pittsburgh in the '80's it seemed everyone either made steel or worked for a company that supported the steel industry.  In Oregon where I am now, the local industry is trees and shrubs and it seems you either work for a nursery or a company that supports that industry.

But anyway, in Elkhart if you want something for an RV somebody will have it on the shelf or be wiling to make it for you.

I suspect it is just more efficient to have a fiberglass shop running panels all the time for different companies rather than building them as needed at the Phoenix building. 

 28 
 on: April 20, 2018, 09:27:46 am 
Started by RVCamping - Last post by RVCamping
Ron/Jatrax - I am starting a new discussion in response to another thread that kind of got off topic. During our detailed factory visit in late March with Earl, he verified where most of the non built PC parts come from.
All exterior vacuum bonded side, roof and floor panels are built by a subcontractor in Elkhart and delivered to PC. The same goes for all the fiberglass pieces such as the front faring, side transition panels, storage bin/doors, the lower skirting panels and the rear cap including the older "Continental style" spare tire cap (which we ordered). That subcontractor is using the original molds created and still owned by PC.
Moryde is the vendor just down the street from PC that performs all frame modifications even south of the rear axle including installing the 5000 lb hitch. I witnessed very professional and high quality workmanship which is vital to the safety, handling and longevity of the coach. A strong foundation is critical to holding up any house, especially a moving one.
All composite wood cabinetry is constructed in house at PC and all hardwood cabinet doors, drawer fronts, table tops and counter extensions are built and finished by a local kitchen cabinet shop.
Cushions, mattresses and furniture custom built to fit the PC cabinetry is obviously sourced from another Elkhart vendor as well.
It was very interesting to learn the who, where and how PC gets it all done, so I am sharing what we learned. - Dick

 29 
 on: April 20, 2018, 08:27:07 am 
Started by ron.dittmer - Last post by ron.dittmer
I put Bilsteins on a Born Free (E-450) that we had and Koni's on my previous PC 2351. Koni's were better IMHO.
Hi Ron,

Were the Bilsteins the heavy duty ones, or the comfort ride ones?
Were the Koni shocks the adjustable red ones, or the gold FSD shocks?

 30 
 on: April 20, 2018, 08:25:05 am 
Started by ron.dittmer - Last post by ron.dittmer
Hi Jim,

Here as well as another forum, I often read of satisfied Bilsteins shock owners.  But the Koni-FSD makes so much sense to me in how they offer a soft ride under normal driving conditions, and kick into heavy-duty mode as needed.  I would blindly buy the Koni-FSD except that they cost nearly twice that of the Bilsteins.  The best on-line deal found so far on each is on the same website HERE.

Thanks for sharing your decision.

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