Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
 91 
 on: September 11, 2014, 09:35:46 pm 
Started by jas - Last post by bobojay
Just found my yellow sticker on the door frame of the passenger cab door.  It is a small strip sticker, easy to miss.

Ann, any idea what yours weighs loaded for a trip? With that 450 chassis, you should have at least 2k lbs of cargo capacity I would think.....

 92 
 on: September 11, 2014, 06:53:06 pm 
Started by jas - Last post by AMW
Just found my yellow sticker on the door frame of the passenger cab door.  It is a small strip sticker, easy to miss.

 93 
 on: September 11, 2014, 03:45:18 pm 
Started by jas - Last post by jas
Thanks everybody:::  After pulling a 5th wheel 9 weeks from WV to the Montana then thru the provinces to Alaska and back. I had 3 tire problems  on the 5th wheel,so i went the way of class B. So overloading a axel is Big to me. I know moving weight around does change things,but if the rear axel is over by 600# with no clothes and food
i don'tl like to start this way. So i will empty the water tank first. Still no word from Kermit. Also no yellow sticker on the cabnets.   I will  check again at the weight station
  17.5 wheels and load range F or G plus one leaf spring  $4,500 ouch  Jim

 94 
 on: September 11, 2014, 01:44:38 pm 
Started by jas - Last post by dickreid1
JAS

See my post of 10 Feb 2013 about overweight on the rear left duals after a shock from the results of weighing all four corners.

This is a real concern for me such that I NEVER FILL MY WATER TANK!  We run with only a few gallons enough to get us to the next campground.

My first clue should have been the sticker on the driver door saying 85 pounds tire inflation which is 5 pounds over-inflated according to Michelin. 

The second indication was the lean to the slide-outs (2) side which was compensated by adding shims to the springs.

I also note that my front-rear weights were within the front-rear limits.  Yours being out of limits gives me considerable concern.

Dick

 95 
 on: September 11, 2014, 12:19:19 pm 
Started by jas - Last post by bobojay
Agree.... exactly!

 96 
 on: September 11, 2014, 11:27:24 am 
Started by jas - Last post by JimDenny
 ThumbsUp
WELL SAID!!

 97 
 on: September 11, 2014, 10:48:48 am 
Started by jas - Last post by TomHanlon
Those stickers are so wrong it is a big joke. A manufacture can only guess at what it might be as they don't have scales. When you start  allowing chanes to the orignal floor plan, are changing the weights. Like you add a slideout, maybe two or three of them, maybe you delete or add a cabinet, you change the weights. Do you really think the manufacture refigures what each option adds or subtracts?

On top of that, the owner then comes along and makes modifcations, like replacing a barrel chair with a captains chair, adding or changing cabinets. Then the wife comes along and moves the pots and pans from the overhead cabinets on the left side to her new kitchen draws on the right side. The weights have changed again.

Two things that some owner make a mistake about are the weight distribution when adding water and supples and the height of each side of the motorhome from the ground. They hear that they should weigh the RV when it is ready for a trip. This number can be close but will change during their trip. They fill the freash water tank, which can put a lot of pounds on one side, then they take a couple of showers, moving a lot of that weight from one side into the gray tank on the other side. Now your weight are changed again. Having the fresh water tank full and measuring the ride heigh then moving the water around to the other side will also change the ride heigh.

I have not heard of any chassis problems due to weight since the 1990's when Toyota was making the mini pickup for conversion to micro-mini motorhomes. The manufactures kept increasing the size of the box they put on the back trying to make them as roomy as a class C. Then the owner would put himself and his wife/girl friend in the front seat and add another couple with all the supplies in the back. Merrerly down the bumpy road they would go until the rear axle would bend or brake. They then wanted Toyota to repair their broken motorhome under warrenty. Toyota stopped making the mini pickup for RV conversion.

My point with all this is that knowing the weight and ride height can be some what usefull, but is to be taken with a grain of salt. After all just think about what happens when two of you sit in the front seats, move to the sofa or dinnitte, then go to bed in the rear. You have moved a lot of weight around, changing the weight distribution and ride height. Then there is that case of beer you brough along for the weekend. Did you move that weight.

Stop worrying and enjoy your RV.

 98 
 on: September 10, 2014, 10:05:27 pm 
Started by jas - Last post by bobander
Jim,

Ron is correct, the sticker with the CCC should be inside one of the cabinet doors.  Coincidentally, my sticker was missing and the factory sent one to me.

Bob

 99 
 on: September 10, 2014, 09:30:08 pm 
Started by jas - Last post by ron.dittmer
Jim jas,

In the past, PC has placed a sticker about 6" x 5" or so, located on the inside of the right side kitchen galley door.  Maybe they place it inside another door today.  It explains the weight of the rig and the weight of added contents such as fresh water and propane, and the final CCC.

Regarding tire pressure recommendations, PC had always placed a sticker in the driver door jamb, for the recommended tire pressure, front and back tires.

If you don't have the stickers, call the factory and ask for them.  I am confident they will send them to you.

 100 
 on: September 10, 2014, 08:35:48 pm 
Started by jas - Last post by jas
Bob  Checked my coach and could not see a yellow sticker with the ccc weight. Checked both cab doors. On the drivers side
two with the GVW for each axel 5,000 front and 9,600 on the rear for a total 14,500# . This is for tire air psi.   Jim

Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]