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Author Topic: TRANSMISSION FLUID CHANGE????  (Read 412 times)
Sparky
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« on: October 14, 2013, 09:20:31 am »

 I was reading this tip on RV daily tips. Interesting regarding transmissions, ( attached below)
   Does anyone change the fluid on a regular basis shorter than recommended?
   How often do you change your fluid
   Since we are hauling around a house on wheels (a little pun)  I would assume the transmission would take a beating and you should schedule
   refills sooner than normal.
   Hopefully some of our more experienced guys will chime in and give us some comments and what they do

Sparky


When should you service your transmission?
Courtesy Motorhomes of Texas
.If you are undecided about whether or not you should service your transmission or when to service it consider this: Transmission failure is most often due to fluid failure. Mechanical parts failure is in the minority when blame is laid. The breakdown and failure of transmission fluid is precipitated by two elements: contaminants and heat with heat winning the race for worst/biggest contributor.
Transmission temperatures run generally in the same range as engine temperature until put under a strain. Heat in the transmission will usually climb higher and faster than engine temperature, with normal "tranny" temp being in the 175 F to 200 F range, and hill climbing takes it up from there.
At 175 F, fluid will last about 120,000 to 140,000 miles (discounting the contamination factor). Its life expectancy decreases almost exponentially with increased heat! At 200 F the breakdown occurs at around 60,000 to 70,000 miles. As you can see, an increase of only 25 degrees can cut the life almost in half. Now see below the increase versus the fluid life:
.   225 degrees = 35,000 miles
.   250 degrees = 20,000 miles
.   275 degrees = 10,000 miles
.   300 degrees = 1,500 miles
.   325 degrees = 500 miles
Short periods of time at higher temperatures also take their toll, but trying to calculate exactly when you should change the fluid has to be done on an individual basis. If you pull a toad and drive in the hills or mountains, you need to service more often. Most high-end motorhomes have transmission coolers and many have temperature gauges. If you dont have these two items, it might be beneficial to have them installed.
Ideally, servicing your transmission would be done as often as every other oil change, but that's just not practical. It would be plenty expensive, and at some point it ceases to be cost-effective. The point is: Be aware of the health of your transmission fluid. Monitor its operating temperatures and service accordingly. Servicing too often wont hurt your wallet near as bad as overhauling the beast.
* * *


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ragoodsp
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2013, 11:05:53 am »

Good post Sparky....first and foremost,  the Ford transmission used  E-350/450's is very close to being bullet proof;  that is unless you are constantly pulling a toad that  pushs 5000 lbs or you load the coach to its its max every time you go out. I am not sure I would go to the max miles as recommended in the book,  I would be more concerened with the time the oil has been sitting with periods of storage thrown in there. .  Using a good synthectic oil is of couse the most important factor. 
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lghjr
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2013, 05:15:29 pm »

The Ford has a tranny cooler in the radiator, very effective from Scan Guage data.  The highest tranny temp I ever saw on an 85 degree day pulling Cucharas pass with a toad was 205 degrees.  Many a  time in Western Kansas and Oklahoma OAT was hovering at 100, with toad but the tranny temp was the same as engine, i.e., 195 with the AC full on.  

Bye the bye the only reason I purchased the SG was to monitor transmission temperature, it is collected by the computer from a sensor in the trans but the only way to read the data through OBDII is through the data port and after market equipment such as Scan Guage or Ford service computers.

Don't know the truth but I have been told the oil doesn't go south the additive package in transmission fluid does, specifically the part that deals with dissolved oxygen that gets churned into the oil.  Take that for what it's worth.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2013, 05:24:41 pm by lghjr » Logged
Sparky
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2013, 07:22:23 pm »

Good info,,, also nice I just purchased a ScanGauge,,,  would seem to me then no need to change the fluid for a long time or lots of miles haha
sparky
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