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Author Topic: Doghouse insulation project (background post 1)  (Read 498 times)
skipper
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« on: December 24, 2013, 05:22:18 pm »

I have significant high frequency hearing loss on my left side and some on my right side.  I can hear just fine in my office but in a noisy restaurant I miss a lot of conversation.  I can hear noise, I just can't distinguish sound.  Understanding women in a noisy environment is really tough.  I can use my cell phone just fine with my right ear in my office and in my F150.  However, I was having difficulty using my cell phone in my 2552 while cruising down the road at 60 to 65 mph. 

I bought an app for my iPhone that uses the microphone as a sound measuring device and did some comparative measuring.  It shows my office as having a noise level of 47-48 dB which is the sound of my computer fan and some very light traffic outside.  My F150 at 70 mph has a sound level of 53-54 dB.  I can use my cell phone or hands free and/or carry on a conversion with a passenger with no difficulty.  In the 2552, I have to raise my voice slightly and my wife has to raise her voice slightly to carry on a conversation.    The meter reads 57-58 dB and peaks at about 60 dB.  Perceived noise is doubled every 10 dB.  So very relatively speaking, my RV is about twice as noisy as my office. and 57-58 dB is about where I have to strain to hear and I must talk a little louder than is comfortable.

With these readings as reference points, I decided to insulate the doghouse.  My goal is to quiet the PC to a level where I can converse in a normal tone and use my cell phone.  I searched online for products and spent a good deal of time reading car audio forums.  It seems everybody has a favorite product but no one has any concrete data as to who has the best product.  I did learn that there are 2 avenues of attack:  Vibration and noise.  Audiophiles prefer to tackle vibration first and noise second.  Vibration is handled by dampening the vibration to a level below our hearing threshold and is accomplish by sticking a dampener to the metal/fiberglass/plastic skin of the vehicle.  The coating needs to cover a min 25% of the surface area to be most effective and more is better.  Think about a percussionist's symbol.  If you strike the symbol it vibrates and makes a lot of noise, but if you put a wet sponge on it that only covers 1/10 of the surface area and strike it again, there is hardly any noise.  That is how the vibration dampeners work. 

Noise is handled by using a barrier between the noise and you.  Lead seems to be the best product, but it is heavy, toxic, and somewhat difficult to work with.  Sound recording studios use foam boards and you can find many closed cell foam materials to put over the vibration dampener.  The issues in a vehicle are getting it to stick to walls and ceilings, the thickness causing fitting issues and compression making it thinner.  The barrier simply prevents noise from penetrating.  That is how sound deadeners work.

I flipped a coin and went with a product called Second Skin Damplifer Pro.  It's a constraint level vibration dampener (CLD).  It's a butyl material with a sticky side and an AL foil side.  The sticky allows you to stick it where it won't fall off, the butyl layer stops vibration and the foil acts as a sound barrier.  At least that is my understanding to very complex subject.  I bought 26 sq ft of the product, a roller to press it down and a can of spay adhesive for about $150 delivered.  It was 40% off on black Friday.  I didn't use the adhesive and could have saved about $12.  The roller was about $12 too.

Next I'll go into some detail of applying the product and the results.

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Mark
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« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2013, 02:19:56 am »

Awesome job, Mark!  I have the same hearing problem, but in my right ear.  Too much time in Navy ship engine rooms.  I had this on my long-term project list and you've made my job much much easier.

  - Mike
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Denny & Barb
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« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2013, 01:40:39 pm »

Yes Mark. Great job, and will also be doing this when warmth comes to the frozen tundra.  I too have hearing loss but in both. Guess too many rock n rolls of the 60s and then had my own when louder was better!. I now have one bionic ear, but should have two. Lots of disadvantages, but one advantage is crowd noise gets to unbearable all one has to do is hit the switch.

Even with bionic, it is still a strain to hear my wife's higher pitched voice when traveling in the PC.
Denny
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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2013, 11:09:16 am »

Skipper
   Interesting post,,, don't forget the pics,,,, I can hear great, but can not see haha,,, good job

sparky

I left my original post,, then I read your other post with the pics,,,great job and thanks.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2013, 11:14:31 am by Sparky » Logged
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