Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Ford 350/450 shifting advice  (Read 516 times)
Doneworking
Sr. Member
****

Helpful Rating: 23
________
OwnPC: Yes
NewUsed: Used
PurchDate: September 2013
Model: 2350 Ford
ModelYear: 2013
Slide: Yes
Location: Oklahoma City
________
Posts: 54


View Profile
« on: July 16, 2014, 06:36:54 pm »

I am curious about others experience with the Ford vehicles when in mountains.   Our 2350 is pulling a Jeep Cherokee which weighs about 4044 curb pounds.   I am surprised how the V10 seems to really pull down on mountain passes, granted they are Rocky Mountain passes where I have experienced this and I am towing.  After one trip in June (and planning another in August) we will probably just unhook the Jeep and my wife will drive it up the passes.  We will be boondocking above 10,000 feet so I am not talking hills LOL

Here is my question.   Do most PC owners use the tow/haul mode which, as I understand it, just changes the shifting points, or do they not use it and just use the downshift from the standard drive position, as well as engine speed to maintain momentum.  Our last Class C  was a 450 and this is a 350 and we were not towing.  I was down to 25 mph going up Bobcat Pass in Northern New Mexico last month.   Maybe that is just the way it is?  Our most previous RV was a Roadtrek Class B 210 with the Chevy 6.0L

ALSO...I have read in some places that the V10 is designed to develop max torgue at 4500-5000 rpms.  Is that correct?   I read on another forum a discussion that indicated that was no problem, but I always hate to "cram" an engine. 

Any experiences, direction or suggestions you could give me would be appreciated. 

Paul
Logged
Barry-Sue
SuperHero Member
******

Helpful Rating: 319
________
OwnPC: Yes
NewUsed: New
PurchDate: 10/17/11
Model: 2551
ModelYear: 2012
Slide: Yes
IntColor: Cherry
ExtColor: Classic Umber
Location: Michigan
________
Posts: 761


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2014, 08:02:32 pm »

Paul

We took our 2008 2350 through the Rockies in 2010.  We were towing a 2500 pound car and were able to top Vale Pass at around 55 MPH.  I never use the tow/haul mode.

One thing I learned about driving in the mountains is to keep your speed up. Don't wait for a downshift before applying additional throttle.   Once you lose your speed it is hard to get it back.

Perhaps a more experienced mountain driver can provide addition information on how to approach some long grades.

Barry
Logged

Barry and Sue 
Current   2012 2551 w/Slide
Previous 2008 2350 w/Slide
ron.dittmer
SuperHero Member
PCPC
*******

Helpful Rating: 180
________
OwnPC: Yes
NewUsed: New
PurchDate: June 2007
Model: 2350 Ford
ModelYear: 2007
Slide: No
IntColor: Cherry&Green
ExtColor: FullBody Gray
Location: Dundee, IL
________
Posts: 1984



View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2014, 08:01:44 am »

With our 2007 E350-V10 & current day Torqshift transmission, towing our 4200 pound Jeep Liberty, I have yet to be worried over the drivetrain except when engine braking.  The RPMs can sometimes get very close to red-line.  At my second oil change I switched to full synthetic oil in hopes to provide a little extra edge to my concerns.

Whether engine braking or climbing, the Triton series engine, V10 or V8, is designed to rev very high compared to the GM engines.  As a result, the engines can get loud which can make you feel you are over-stressing something.  But in reality, all is well.

I personally love the tow haul mode.  I called Ford twice over the years, asking if Tow-Haul could be reprogramed to be "On" by default, but I get the same disappointing answer.

As Barry said, try not to loose momentum when driving in the mountains.  When you do, just take it slow (or slower) in a lower gear.  You want the rig to rev high with the least amount of throttle.  Once in a great while you will simply find yourself at very high RPMs in a very low gear, going very slow.  As uncomfortable as it might feel, the drivetrain is designed to work just like that.  As always, give consideration to the other drivers around you.

In answer to your Tow-Haul mode question... It changes the shift points under both conditions, accelerating and decelerating.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2014, 12:29:11 am by ron.dittmer » Logged

Ron Dittmer (wife Irene) 2007 Model 2350 Without A Slideout
Our Rig Is Available For Viewing Any Time Of Year In Dundee, IL
Stored At Home In Our Heated Garage (Well-Lit & Warm Comfort In Winter)
Pax
Hero Member
*****

Helpful Rating: 47
________
OwnPC: Yes
NewUsed: New
PurchDate: July
Model: 2552
ModelYear: 2014
Slide: Yes
IntColor: Sunlit / Cherry
ExtColor: Sunlit
Location: Northern California
________
Posts: 276



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2014, 10:36:55 am »

We aren't experienced mountain drivers (well, in an RV that is), but did have the opportunity to tackle a few mountains on our recent trip coast to coast.

We have a 2552 and tow a heavy Ford Edge (4500+ lbs), both loaded typically for long trips.  This is the first trip I've used tow/haul mode and only used it when there was either a series of upcoming ascents/descents or one long or steep ascent/descent.  I was impressed by how it functioned, and was especially glad I had it going down a very very steep and windy section coming out of Yellowstone.  Never had much of a problem with long, steep ascents if I was able to get the speed up beforehand. But even when I was 'trapped' behind slow moving big rigs I managed 40 mph at about 4300 rpm.....and sometimes was even able to gain speed and pass other rigs, albeit slowly, while on the grade.  If you are familiar with grades such as between Cheyenne and Laramie on I-80, or going over the Donner Pass on I-80 (either direction), then this is the type of grade I'm referring to.

I am very happy we have tow/haul!

    - Mike
Logged
bobojay
Full Member
***

Helpful Rating: 11
________
OwnPC: No
NewUsed: New
Model: None
Slide: No
IntColor: Desert Sand-Hickory
ExtColor: Desert Sand-Lower
Location: Kansas
________
Posts: 49


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2014, 05:10:01 pm »

Having had several years worth of experience with 2 F series Ford chassis cabs, 450's, heavily loaded constantly, 10k+ pounds, in Fire Dept. service, standard operating procedure, and Ford fleet sales recommended, is for us to run them in tow/haul all the time. It's easier on the engine, brakes and transmission.
We have had zero issues with the drivetrain doing this
Logged

Bob & Sharon
Current: 2013 Winnebago ERA Class B Sprinter Van
Future: 2100 special, 2350, ?? on a 450 chassis, no slide
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
 
Jump to: