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Author Topic: Tires for Sprint Phoenix Cruiser  (Read 1313 times)
LRS
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« on: September 22, 2011, 10:07:25 pm »

After getting the oil changed and the sprinter phoenix checked over in general....the shop owner told me about some e-mails he had
received about someone with a similar vehicle and the same tires...Kuhmo (sp.?)  blowing....multiple tires on the writer's
 rv.
Some got bubbles in the sidewalls.   
Has anyone had any trouble with these tires?   My P.C. is listed as 2010, but the Sprinter manual that came with it has 2008
on the cover!!
The factories buy these chassis with the tires on them...and sometimes they might sit...so, am I correct to figure that my tires
could be almost 4 years old....instead of 2?
The recommendation for replacing rv tires is 5-7 years, I think.   For safety, I might better get new tires...especially after hearing
about the tires on my rv have had bad reviews.
What kind of tires should I get?  (The shop owner said to get Michelin.) ????
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Bob Mahon
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« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2011, 07:44:58 am »

I've checked some reviews of Kumho tires and they're not all that bad (certainly not as bad as the Goodyear tire reviews I've read).
Could his statements merely be an effort to sell you new tires?
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« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2011, 09:43:36 am »

I have had tire problems in the past and found that the DOT markings provide some good information.  Especially when it comes to age and plant of origin.  NHTSA would be a good source of information if there is a problem with these tires.

Tires manufactured after 2000 have the following DOT format.

DOT AABB CCCC DDEE
AA= Manufacturing Plant, Includes country
BB= Tire Size
CCCC= Discretionary use of manufacturer
DD=Week of year manufactured
EE= Year of manufacturer

I have also heard RV tires should be replaced every 4 or 5 years but most of the time it is in reference to travel trailers.   The PC uses light truck tires which have different characteristics than trailer tires.  This question  might need further research before the correct answer can be found.

Barry
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« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2011, 09:55:56 pm »

Barry beat me again.  I too concur with him.  In fact, Motorhome magazine also recommends the replacement of tires on mh's every 4-5 years.  The rubber can degrade without any visual signs.

DJM
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« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2011, 10:10:55 pm »

Important tire preservation measures include covering the tires against UV rays, balancing, correct alignment, proper inflation and not using petro-chemical dressing on them. I also store the PC on wood over the winter when it's not being used for extended periods.
Also, don't bounce them off curbs and try to avoid pot-holes as best you can.

I've been fortunate in that over the 30+ years I've been at this I've not experienced tire problems (knock wood, yes?).
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« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2011, 08:35:53 am »

My input on the life of tires.

If your rig is outdoors all the time, and is near the max load rating all the time, I would agree that changing tires sooner would be a safe bet.

But.....

If like me, your rig is stored indoors protected from the sun & temperature extremes, your rig is light weight for the tire rating, and there is no serious cracking of sidewalls, then you can extend their usefulness.

Our first motor home stored in a climate controlled environment, was very light weight, only 5000 pounds max loaded with duel "D" rated tires.  We owned the motor home for 24 years.  I sold the motor home with it's 3rd set of tires on it.  They were 12 years old and still looked great.  The first two sets didn't last as long for other unrelated reasons.

With our 2007 2350 weighing in around 10,000 pounds loaded for trips, and original Michelin "E" rated tires, stored indoors, etc. etc. I don't plan on changing tires for a very long time to come.  I hope to get 12+ years from these too, baring any unique problem that might arise like damage from road debris for example.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2011, 08:47:11 am by ron.dittmer » Logged

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LRS
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« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2011, 09:54:24 pm »

I really appreciate all of the tire advice!!!  After reading your replies, talking to others, and doing
research...I am getting new tires....was not wanting to have the expense...but have decided it will
give me peace of mind.  Thank you all.  Upon further observation, I found that the tires on my 2010 rv are dated 2007.
The cruiser is outdoors, but in a "carport" on concrete.  It is nestled in trees and "woods"...not indoors
and lucky to be heated like some of yours.  I am in Florida.
 One guy parked his rv on wood.  Is that if the rv is on
the ground...rather than concrete?   ??   
Anyhow, I feel better now that the decision has been made---right or wrong.  Happy rv-ing to all!
Smile  LRS
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« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2011, 12:04:47 am »

I found that the tires on my 2010 rv are dated 2007.
What model year is your chassis that the tires are 3 years older than the PC model year?

Oh Wait!!!

I recall Phoenix USA bought up a pile of 2008 Sprinter chassis in 2009 at bankruptcy auctions.  You likely have one of the 2008 chassis.  Kermit did a real smart move to stay in business when the motor home industry died.  He bought up Sprinters at auctions cheap, and then offered PC-Sprinters with those 2008 chassis priced at his cost.  Basically the Sprinter cost you people the same as an E350 Ford during that special he was offering in 2009/2010.  It was ingenious, a win-win for both PC-USA and their customers.  You have a "Bargain Sprinter".  With everything you shared and now understood, if your tires are not cracking, I would not yet replace them.

Adding:  I need to go to sleep.  I just read your initial post.  You clarified you have a 2008 chassis right from the start.  Duh to me.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2011, 12:19:45 am by ron.dittmer » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2011, 09:22:09 am »

LRS

When tires are in direct contact with concrete the concrete will suck the lubricating oils out of the tires.  Whenever I park a vehicle for any length of time I always have a nonporous substance between my tires and the concrete.

Barry
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« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2011, 03:42:25 pm »

Until recently, I have had difficulty keeping my 2350 dual wheels inflated properly. One of the valve extensions that came with the 2350S snapped off and left me with a flat. When that happened, I replaced the original ones with "airless" ones from Camping World. Those worked better but were tricky to adjust and one became unadjusted and left me with another flat.

I researched available solutions and installed some very robust, lifetime-warranted units found at: http://yourtireshopsupply.com/category/780_782/dually-valve-kits for $120 plus shipping. They work! I have had them in use for a couple of months now and the pressures in all four tires have stayed within 0.5 psi of each other. The only changes in pressure are in line with temperature changes measured at dawn (expect 1 degree F for each 10 degrees of change since your last check). These units are not user installable; a tire shop will need 1-2 hours to install them. This may seem expensive, but a failed tire can ruin your life.

I just completed a round trip from NC to TX and did not worry about the tires. But, I still check the tires each morning before getting underway. The company that sells the extended valves also sells some metal caps with a built in valve at its tip. They allow you to check quickly your pressures without fiddling with screw-on valve caps.

Another subject: At about 20,000 miles I have had no problems with my 2008 Kumho tires.
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