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Author Topic: Tire rotation  (Read 489 times)
echo11
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« on: October 12, 2011, 08:08:37 pm »

Hi,
I have seen conflicting info on whether it is important to rotate tires on a RV or not.  I'd like to know what other PC owners do.  Also, if you do rotate, how often to you do it.
Thanks- Roni
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lmichael
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2011, 10:42:16 pm »

I believe the tires should be rotated.  I follow the Ford manual and rotate the front tires to the opposite front sides, and the duals together to the opposite back sides.  I can't find any mileage recommendations, so I've been following the Costco recommendation for our car--7,500.  That's probably too soon, but I have the time and tools that make it fairly simple--and I take the opportunity to check the brakes and under the PC at the same time.  The next time I'm going to take the wheels in to have them balanced while they're off.  I've also been thinking about including the spare in the front rotation.  Not supposed to use it on the duals since it has a rubber valve stem instead of metal one that's required for the valve extension.
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echo11
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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2011, 07:38:49 pm »

Thanks for your response.  I actually have an appt next week at the local Ford service place for an oil and filter change.  While I am there I will see about their suggestion for rotating the tires.  Actually, your comment about the spare's valve was a big surprise.  About 2 months ago we had a flat with one of the duals.  The spare was used to replace the flat.  Nothing was wrong with the tire.  It was thought to be a loose value extender.  Since our RV is a 2011, with very low mileage, we decided to leave the spare where it was.  After reading your response, we will definitely, during service, have them check to see is the valve stem is rubber or metal.  Thanks again for the info.
Roni


   
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ron.dittmer
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2011, 06:51:57 am »

If you are a high mileage RV traveler, then tire rotation along with tire balancing would be smart.  But most people will replace their tires due to age rather than uneven thread wear.

My garage kept 2007 PC-2350 with original tires is now 4.5 years old with 16,000 miles on the odometer.  The tires still look brand new, no signs of wear that I have observed.  When the tires get to be 12 years old, I will have roughly 45,000 miles on them.  Whatever uneven thread wear I have due to the lack of tire rotation, will be so much less a concern as compared to their age.

Nobody but me plans to keep their tires that long.  It will depend on sidewall cracking and other observation.  My tires stay in a climate controlled garage and the weight of my 2350 without a slideout is much less than the max rating of the tires.  I had the same scenario with my first motor home....12 year old tires (twice), never rotating them worked out well.

Another benefit to "not" rotaing your tires over so many years is to observe uneven thread wear, not between tires, but on each tire, mainly the front tires.  It would indicate if you need a wheel alignment.

I have a unique situation, but it does make a point about age versus threadwear.  
« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 10:44:19 am by ron.dittmer » Logged

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bigbadjc
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2011, 07:51:31 am »

I would tend to be more like Ron than some of the other views expressed.  Maybe some of you really put the miles on your units, but most of us will take a long time to really wear out their tires.  I've got a 6 year old unit that I bought 2 years ago with 4K miles on it.  The first owner stored it indoors and the tires looked like new then.  I store it inside and the tires still look like brand new with 15K on the unit.  How long will a tire last?  If you look on Google, you will find that some sources recommend replacing when the tire is 5 years old.  I suspect that these sources are somehow involved in selling tires.  Most manufacturers seem to recommend replacing the tires at 10 years regardless of how they look.  If you keep your unit out of the sun and harsh weather, you should not have a lot of trouble with cracking between the tread ridges or crazing of the sidewalls in 10 years with quality tires.  I have always used Michelins on most of my vehicles and have gotten great life out of them.  IF you could find a good shop for aligning large chassis vehicles like RV's, I suspect that would be more effective in cutting tire wear than rotation would be.  The exact rotation pattern is not as clearcut for dual rear wheels as it is for the normal car.  Also, if your vehicle is well aligned, rotation should not be that critical.  As far as balancing is concerned, your steering wheel and your ride will tell you if you have a problem there.  Remember that current methods of balancing wheels are not as effective as they once were because safety concerns preclude spinning them on the vehicle at highway speeds, which is the only way to get a perfect balance.  I tend to check my tires for wear that might indicate alignment problems, balance the front wheels when I feel any vibration in the steering wheel, and will consider replacing the tires when I see excess wear, sidewall crazing indicating dry rot, or splits between the treads.  I would also probably change them at 10-12 Kmiles if I ever keep one that long.
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BGolden
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« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2011, 07:46:32 am »

This is a great subject that has been discussed at many camp gatherings over the years. My personal opinion is to Rotate my tires when I winterize my RV at the end of the season.  I'm sure that we all have different ideas of how we maintain our vehicles.  That's why we have this  forum. Ask questions,,,,,get good answers.

Bill Golden        Cheers
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