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Author Topic: Conserving Battery Reserves Without Shore Power  (Read 8928 times)
njheart on the road
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« Reply #15 on: October 13, 2012, 07:18:42 am »

Thank you guys -- Ron, Tom, and George -- stepping up to the PC from its small country cousins (B vans), I was concerned that perhaps the Phoenix was set up somehow differently, and the last thing I want, now that we are going into winter hibernation here in Illinois, was to go out and find out one weekend that I had "killed" another battery -- in this case two! -- because I didn't understand how it all worked with this big baby.  I had a pretty good routine with the PW, keeping it ship shape even during the off season with regard to plumbing and batteries and such, so now that we have applied "Miracle Grow Wax" (what we are teasingly saying to our camping buddies, because "Look, it grew!!!!!!) and the PW has become a PC, there's a whole lot more to maintain.  Batteries are my primary concern next to plumbing in the winter -- so this education has been important.

And if sis and I decide to do a little more boondocking as we adventure out more and more -- I will be prepared with a little more knowledge about the batteries than I had before...Again, thanks -- I really appreciate these mini seminars via the forum, guys.  Lots of helpful votes!
 ThankYou  Cheer  nod
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Zorba
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« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2012, 01:00:03 pm »

...Daily use of 110v appliances (via the inverter) like making coffee and watching movies, drains the batteries quickly...
Which is why we have a small, stove top percolator so we can make coffee using gas!
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ron.dittmer
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« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2013, 02:32:52 pm »

This trip in 2013, we had electric hookup for 2 nights over the 30 day period.  It was our first trip taken without our tow vehicle.  This meant we drove the PC everywhere.  Oh course the batteries get charged while driving.
  
Another thing we did different was running the generator for about an hour most mornings.  During that time we'd make coffee with our electric drip coffee maker, charge the coach batteries, laptop computer, camera, and cell phone batteries.  We also heated up the hot water tank for the day.

Between those two main changes, our battery reserves never went low so we never had to resort to the Black & Decker charger.

If you are wondering about hot water, we always resorted to propane when it came to showering up.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2013, 01:36:06 pm by ron.dittmer » Logged

Ron & Irene Dittmer, 2007 Model 2350 Without A Slideout
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keelhauler
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« Reply #18 on: October 07, 2013, 12:58:06 pm »

I would like to clarify the battery charging for our readers.
The Inverter DOES NOT charge the batteries, it is XADC-60 Converter that outputs the DC power and charges the batteries.

The problem with charging batteries when hooked to 110v power or using the generator is that the converter is not set up to fully charge your batteries.
The converter floats at 13.5 volts and charges max at 14.2 volts. The battery manufacturers recommend 14.8 volts.
The result for most RV'rs is that you probably only get your batteries charged to 80% of capacity. So they still work but they discharge quicker than they should.

When you use a solar array and a good charge controller you find the float set up at 13,7 volts and the max at 14.9 volts. The batteries get fully charged.

I think I will post a few electrical system schematics of PC's 110v & DC power systems on a separate post to clarify how they are wired.
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John
KenBrockman
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« Reply #19 on: April 28, 2016, 04:56:56 pm »

Having just read through this thread, I thought I'd add some notes:

Newer PC models have a Parallax Converter (AC to DC) and a Xantrex 1800 Inverter (DC to AC).

The converter provides lighting and charges the house batteries from either shore power or the generator.  It is a smart charger that can be used for long term battery maintenance.

UPDATE -- My mistake.  The Parallax 555 (which is on my 2014 model) is not a smart charger so it will boil your battery if continuously left on (there is a battery connection switch by the entry door of the 2552).  I am looking into a replacement for the converter section to get smart charging.

The inverter provides 110V AC from the house batteries.  If you are on shore/gen power, then the inverter has a built-in transfer switch to bypass use of the batteries.

Regarding disconnecting the Inverter when dry camping:  Things have gotten better.
"The XM 1800s low standby battery demand means you dont have to
worry about excessive drain on your battery if you leave the inverter on
for a few days. When the XM 1800 is on but no power is being
supplied to a load, the inverter draws, on average, less than 0.5 A (XM
1000) or less than 0.7 A (XM 1800) from the battery."

« Last Edit: May 09, 2016, 11:13:34 am by KenBrockman » Logged
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