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Emergency preparedness

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donc13

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Emergency preparedness
« on: May 07, 2016, 03:45:56 pm »
What kind  of severe weather/fire  preparations do you make while in your motorhome?   

I am currently re-working my "go-bag"  list of what can stay in the bag and what needs to be gathered quickly should we need to  get inside  of a  Walmart or campground restroom. 

When any weather is expected,  we  sleep with the battery-powered  weather radio on and the slide closed.

It's been a wild year already.  Our thoughts are with those folks down  South and especially  now  in Canada.
---
Don and Patti

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Pax

Re: Emergency preparedness
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2016, 07:31:52 pm »
Not to be flippant, honestly......but if you run into a Walmart, all you really need is cash.   I have never seen any campground restroom as significant as my PC, but then again I don't generally use them.  Most weather events are fairly predictable and we have steered away from them for the most part.  Our plan is to move away from those areas as soon as possible, but always have the technology available to easily locate emergency services local to the area.  Our PC (2552) is not large enough to take anything of value in an actual emergency like you seem to be describing.  It already has power, water, sewer, refrigeration, heat, ventilation, etc.  We do have a satellite phone and canned goods.  Can't think of much beyond that.

   - Mike

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Carol

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Re: Emergency preparedness
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2016, 07:45:00 pm »
My backpack go-to bag has cash and checkbook in it.  If needed, then I will throw in the PC, address book, purse, wi-fi with charger, and cell phone with charger.  If I know bad weather is in the area, I keep everything handy to stuff into the bag.  I also try to keep everything close to fully charged.  If something comes up unexpectedly, I'll be happy to get at least the backpack, phone, and doggy to a safer spot.

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bhgareau

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Re: Emergency preparedness
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2016, 08:46:54 pm »
We built each of our seasonal emergency preparedness kits by referring to both  aaa.com and  ready.gov. We have four kits, one for each of our vehicles and another for the house. We adapt each of them by season. The seasonal adjustments are particularly important in our climate as they would seem to be in yours.

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2 Frazzled

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Re: Emergency preparedness
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2016, 06:20:53 am »
I'll be honest and say we don't have a set kit put together but when a tornado was bearing down on us on the Natchez Trace, we did quickly grab basic items that we always have handy. John and I have had survival training so it's kind of funny but after the bare basics, most of what we brought was to keep the cat happy, or as happy as a cat can get locked in a stinky cinder block bathroom with a bunch of strangers while a storm screamed through.

Part of what you need for your kit will be determined by your own skills and where you are. Short term the cell phone, charger (solar charger is even better), weather radio, cash, passport and/or driver's license, credit card, check book, flashlight, first aid kit, water bottles etc. are great. Several of these assume you are somewhere with signal or power or stores where you can use them. That night on the Natchez Trace, we knew there might not be a Phoenix to go back to. The tornado swung overhead and touched down just a few miles away... but it WAS a few miles away so all was well.

Remember that if you need medications, those have to be with you. You don't know when you will get more. Never let your prescription run down too low.

If you are in a MAJOR disaster, you should be prepared for basic survival. You can go several weeks without food. You can only go three days without water. You need shelter. I recommend everyone tuck contractor weight trash bags (2 per person) into vehicle glove boxes or emergency kits. You can wear one to keep in heat and keep out rain, you can tie a string between two trees and make one or two into an A-frame tent, you can use one as a sun shield. Quick, easy, light weight shelter. They can also carry water or capture water when it rains. A mylar emergency blanket can do many of the same things as well as being shiny enough to attract attention from rescue teams.

Water. If you remembered your water bottle and are not in the arid desert (different skills needed there), you only need one more item: iodine tablets. I have strained pretty murky water through my bandanna (or t-shirt), treated with iodine, and drank it. I'm not dead. They sell a two bottle set that has iodine tabs and something that makes it taste less nasty. I find that worth the extra cost. Another option is a Lifestraw that will clean hundreds of gallons of water. We have a full fledged backpack water filter but these other items are better suited to a go bag. Whatever you get, make sure you know how to use it. The iodine tabs are tiny, the Lifestraw is super handy but takes more space.

Next up is fire. Get some of those magnesium sticks that shoot awesome sparks and stick one in each kit. Make sure you practice with them first. You need dry tinder (tiny burnable stuff, pine needles, cotton pocket lint, little strips from inside broken sticks (when it rains, wood is wet on the outside, dry on the inside). Get out your pocket knife and learn how to make wood shavings. Then build fires. Small, hot fires are best. Practice the skill before you need the skill.

I have a Boy Scout cap that says "Attitude, gotta have it." This is so true. The most important thing you can have is a good ATTITUDE. The best way to get a good survival attitude is self confidence... which you get by knowing what you are doing. There are classes, books, internet sites, etc. that can get you to that point. Hands on is the best way to get it into your brain. Challenge your friends and family. Have contests and build fires, purify water, build shelters using the items in your survival kit. Test different ways to do each thing. Then put together your kit, kick back, and enjoy the world.



John, Holly, and sometimes Chloe.
Travel Blog: Spiritofthewoods.net

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Re: Emergency preparedness
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2016, 06:27:26 am »
One more important item. Once you figure out what should be in your kit, make a list - clean, concise, easy to read - and tape it to the inside door of a cabinet or some other easy to grab place. If you have specific "Go Pack" put the list in there (preferably in a zip lock baggie). Panic time is NOT the time to count on memory to make sure you have everything you need.

In a perfect world, all your stuff is already in a ready to grab kit. In the real world, your cell phone, charger and other items are in use elsewhere or were pulled out to show someone or to use for some reason. Use your list, grab your stuff, and roll out.
John, Holly, and sometimes Chloe.
Travel Blog: Spiritofthewoods.net