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Author Topic: Battery watering systems  (Read 1247 times)
frecklestweety
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« on: January 25, 2017, 04:12:09 pm »

I am always concerned with the water in the batteries.  It is so hard to get to the back cells in the batteries to check the water. You have to disconnect the cables to get the caps off. I was checking into Flow Rite MP2000 Quik Fill 12V double RV battery watering system.  RVUpgrades.com has the system for $49.19 and the pump for the system at $18.03.   This would make it so much easier to keep in check.  So does any one use this system.  I have 2-12v battery system and looking to make is easier for me.
I have a 2010, 2551 and looking forward to the next camping season.  Motorhome is kept in a garage and out of the elements.
So any suggestions?
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Michelle Dungan
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« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2017, 01:49:20 am »

I have no idea whether this would work in your situation, but a lighted dental mirror for checking the water level one-handed is sometimes easier than a small mirror in one hand and a small flashlight in the other, though either can work.  Nighttime if outside, or in garage, can make it easier to see water levels with mirrors and small lights when batteries are in recessed compartments as it avoids the glare of sunlight.   For adding water, an eyedropper and a coffee mug with distilled or deionized water works to fill cells to correct level.  This was learned on Dad's '97 Roadtrek 170, with a battery in a box recessed into a corner in the rear storage compartment.

Never overfill cells; remember they'll overflow if you add too much water when the battery is discharged as it expands when charged.  In many batteries, the correct level is just below to just touching the bottom of a recessed ring below the neck of the cell when the battery is charged.  And if you have a battery that takes water and it needs it often, there may be an overcharge problem with some part of the system.
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Doneworking
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« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2017, 08:56:14 am »

I have found that a simple $2 kitchen baster works as a giant eyedropper to fill the batteries.  I simply use a good LED flashlight to inspect them.  Also, I keep a gallon of distilled water in the garage. 

I have strips of colored paper cut to about 1/2 inch wide by a few inches long that I dip into each hole until my thumb stops them.  Then, I observe the distance from the top of the water mark on the paper to my thumb to determine if I am up to the magic ring in each hole.  That is easier sometimes than trying to use the flashlight.  Probably more accurate as well.

Paul
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ron.dittmer
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« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2017, 11:32:21 am »

Hi frecklestweety,

I think every PC owner with wet acid batteries can relate to your post.  Funny reading Michelle Dungan and DoneWorking, I've considered similar.  My own problems were amplified from issues with road grime and battery cables making the task of inspecting battery levels quite painful.  I improved on both as the years passed but never really had a perfect resolve until it came time to replace our second set of conventional 12V batteries two years ago.  For the 3rd set still in service today, I decided to try a pair of sealed AGM 6V batteries and all my battery troubles of every kind I dealt with are gone....really really gone.  It's a beautiful thing.

If you also battle the crusties on your battery terminals, whether your PC house batteries or chassis, even your other vehicles, doing THIS will make that problem history.

Happy Trails!
Ron Dittmer
« Last Edit: January 26, 2017, 11:40:46 am by ron.dittmer » Logged

Ron & Irene Dittmer, 2007 Model 2350, Ordered Without A Slideout
frecklestweety
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2017, 01:33:01 pm »

I am always concerned with the water in the batteries.  It is so hard to get to the back cells in the batteries to check the water. You have to disconnect the cables to get the caps off. I was checking into Flow Rite MP2000 Quik Fill 12V double RV battery watering system.  RVUpgrades.com has the system for $49.19 and the pump for the system at $18.03.   This would make it so much easier to keep in check.  So does any one use this system.  I have 2-12v battery system and looking to make is easier for me.
I have a 2010, 2551 and looking forward to the next camping season.  Motorhome is kept in a garage and out of the elements.
So any suggestions?

Thanks for the input. I did check the level and they seem to be ok. My son also said so.  They are new batteries as of last year.
It is so hard to check the back part of the batteries as I have to disconnect the cables to lift the covers of the batteries.   So I guess I will just keep a check on them.  Thanks again.
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frecklestweety
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« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2017, 01:35:37 pm »

I have no idea whether this would work in your situation, but a lighted dental mirror for checking the water level one-handed is sometimes easier than a small mirror in one hand and a small flashlight in the other, though either can work.  Nighttime if outside, or in garage, can make it easier to see water levels with mirrors and small lights when batteries are in recessed compartments as it avoids the glare of sunlight.   For adding water, an eyedropper and a coffee mug with distilled or deionized water works to fill cells to correct level.  This was learned on Dad's '97 Roadtrek 170, with a battery in a box recessed into a corner in the rear storage compartment.

Never overfill cells; remember they'll overflow if you add too much water when the battery is discharged as it expands when charged.  In many batteries, the correct level is just below to just touching the bottom of a recessed ring below the neck of the cell when the battery is charged.  And if you have a battery that takes water and it needs it often, there may be an overcharge problem with some part of the system.
Thanks for the input.
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frecklestweety
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« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2017, 01:38:25 pm »

I have found that a simple $2 kitchen baster works as a giant eyedropper to fill the batteries.  I simply use a good LED flashlight to inspect them.  Also, I keep a gallon of distilled water in the garage. 

I have strips of colored paper cut to about 1/2 inch wide by a few inches long that I dip into each hole until my thumb stops them.  Then, I observe the distance from the top of the water mark on the paper to my thumb to determine if I am up to the magic ring in each hole.  That is easier sometimes than trying to use the flashlight.  Probably more accurate as well.

Paul
Thanks for the idea of colored paper as it is hard to get to the back cells with flashlight without disconnecting the cables. I will give this a try.  Baster is another good idea or an emptied squirt bottle like mustard comes in.
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sailors35
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« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2017, 06:03:13 pm »

I am always concerned with the water in the batteries.  It is so hard to get to the back cells in the batteries to check the water. You have to disconnect the cables to get the caps off. I was checking into Flow Rite MP2000 Quik Fill 12V double RV battery watering system.  RVUpgrades.com has the system for $49.19 and the pump for the system at $18.03.   This would make it so much easier to keep in check.  So does any one use this system.  I have 2-12v battery system and looking to make is easier for me.
I have a 2010, 2551 and looking forward to the next camping season.  Motorhome is kept in a garage and out of the elements.
So any suggestions?


I have used a squeeze type bottle with small tip that can closed or opened by twisting left or right.  It also has scale for ounces and ml on bottle.  Probably can find at medical supply store or kitchen supply.  Also on my Trojan T-105's I used 'Water Miser Caps" which greatly reduced the number of times adding water.  Not sure they will work on your batteries, believe I got them from Northern Arizona Solar and Wind.  Probably can just Google "Water Miser Battery Caps".
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« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2017, 04:57:45 pm »

Freckles, we have a 2552 with two 6volt batteries and we use a filling system like the Flow Rite. This method is super easy to use: pull out the hose, connect the pump, dip pump into distilled water, pump until the pump is firm, you're done. I recommend it at any price.
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John and Carol
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